Category Archives: 02 Infectious Disease

2007 Threat #02 Infectious Disease Top Cited Authors

Published, as of March 2007.  # articles, # citations.

Takashi Suzuki 66 33995
Department of Biochemistry,
Department of Radiobiochemistry,
University of Shizuoka,
School of Pharmaceutical Science,
52-1 Yada, Shizuoka-shi 422, Japan

Yi Li 56 32905
Centre de microbiologie et biotechnologie,
INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier,
Université du Québec,
531 boul. des Prairies, Laval,
Québec H7V 1B7, Canada

Sanjay Kumarexternal link 118 30011
Bacterial and Parasitic Diseases Section,
Division of Emerging and Transfusion Transmitted Diseases,
Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research,
Food and Drug Administration, HFM-313,
1401 Rockville Pike,
Rockville, MD 20852-1448

Jun Li 68 29576
Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases,
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases,
National Institutes of Health,
Bethesda, MD 20892-0425

Jeffrey I. Cohenexternal link 62 26976
Medical Virology Section,
Laboratory of Clinical Infectious Diseases,
National Institutes of Health,
Bethesda, MD 20982-1888

Arvind Kumar 90 23593
Departments of Gastroenterology,
Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences,
Lucknow 226 014 India

Yasuo Suzuki 61 21478
CREST,
Japan Science and Technology Agency,
Saitama, 332-0012, Japan

Seth Kalichmanexternal link 91 18522
Department of Psychology,
University of Connecticut,
406 Babbidge Road,
Storrs, CT 06269

Jean H. Kim 53 16962
Chinese University of Hong Kong,
Hong Kong Special
Administrative Region,
People’s Republic of China

Gupta S 73 15107
Division of Infectious Diseases,
Indiana University
School of Medicine,
Wishard Hospital,
Indianapolis, IN 46202

Sharma Sk 131 11240
Department of Medicine,
All India Institute of Medical Sciences,
New Delhi, India

Kuo-Hsiung Leeexternal link 54 8921
Division of Medicinal Chemistry,
School of Pharmacy,
University of North Carolina,
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599

Yoshifumi Takedaexternal link 50 7943
Faculty of Human Life Sciences,
Jissen Women’s University,
Hino, Tokyo 191-8510, Japan

Peter Andersen 98 5559
Statens Serum Institute,
Copenhagen, Denmark

Nirmal Kumar Gangulyexternal link 57 3881
Department of Gastroenterology,
G B Pant Hospital,
New Delhi 110 002 India

Stefan H. E. Kaufmannexternal link 98 3705
Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology,
Department of Immunology,
Schumannstr, 21-22,
10117 Berlin, Germany

Stewart T. Coleexternal link 68 3643
Génétique Moléculaire Bactérienne and
Biochimie Structurale Units,
Institut Pasteur,
Paris 75724 Cedex 15, France

Robert K. Heatonexternal link 20 3600
HIV Neurobehavioral Research Center,
University of California San Diego,
La Jolla, CA

Reto Brunexternal link 71 3445
Swiss Tropical Institute,
CH-4002 Basel, Switzerland

Jeffrey A. Kellyexternal link 67 3015
Center for AIDS Intervention Research,
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine,
Medical College of Wisconsin,
Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Nicholas J. Whiteexternal link 213 2996
Faculty of Tropical Medicine,
Mahidol University,
420/6 Rajvithi Rd.,
Bangkok 10400, Thailand

Richard E. Chaissonexternal link 63 2824
Johns Hopkins University,
Baltimore, MD

Sujit K. Bhattacharyaexternal link 89 2289
Rajendra Memorial Research Institute
of Medical Sciences,
Agamkuan, India

John D. Clemensexternal link 56 2263
Retired (P.C.); Department of Pediatrics,
University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria,
Peoria, IL

Mendel E. Singerexternal link 26 2228
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics,
Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine,
WG-57, 10900 Euclid Avenue,
Cleveland, OH 44106

Paul D. Clearyexternal link 16 2147
Dean of Public Health,
Chair, Epidemiology and Public Health
Yale School of Public Health
60 College Street
P.O. Box 208034
New Haven, CT 06520.8034

J. A. Cataniaexternal link 50 2118
Center for AIDS Prevention Studies,
University of California, San Francisco,
74 New Montgomery, Suite 600,
San Francisco, CA 94105

Ron D. Haysexternal link 23 2095
UCLA AIDS Institute Center for AIDS Research,
Los Angeles, CA

Chris Dyeexternal link 49 2002
Communicable Diseases,
World Health Organization,
1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland

Yo Hoshinoexternal link 52 1993
Department of Pediatrics,
Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine,
Nagoya, Japan

Robert G. Websterexternal link 62 1977
Division of Virology,
Department of Infectious Diseases,
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital,
Memphis, Tennessee

Don C. Des Jarlaisexternal link 44 1962
Edmond de Rothschild Foundation Chemical Dependency Institute,
Beth Israel Medical Center,
New York, NY

Adrian V S Hillexternal link 113 1957
Nuffield Department of Medicine,
University of Oxford,
John Radcliffe Hospital,
Oxford, OX3 9DU, UK

David Vlahovexternal link 132 1923
New York Academy of Medicine,
Center for Urban Epidemiological Studies,
New York, NY

Louis H. Millerexternal link 55 1858
Laboratory of Malaria and Vector Research,
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases,
National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892

Rex Forehandexternal link 18 1857
Department of Psychology,
University of Vermont, VT

Robert W. Snowexternal link 113 1856
Kenya Medical Research Institute–
Wellcome Trust Collaborative Program,
00100 GPO, PO Box 43640,
Nairobi, Kenya

Jan Holmgrenexternal link 60 1745
Department of Medical Microbiology & Immunology and
Göteborg University Vaccine Research Institute (GUVAX),
Göteborg University,
SE-405 30 Göteborg, Sweden

Peter M. Smallexternal link 51 1698
Division of Infectious Diseases and Geographic Medicine,
Stanford University Medical Center,
Stanford, CA 94305

Ian M. Ormeexternal link 85 1684
Colorado State University,
Fort Collins, CO 80523

D. B. Youngexternal link 53 1661
MRC Tuberculosis and Related Infections Unit
London W12 OHS, UK

Julio S. G. Montanerexternal link 78 1567
St. Paul’s Hospital/
University of British Columbia,
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Mary K. Estesexternal link 52 1501
Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology,
Baylor College of Medicine,
Houston, TX

Ralph J. Diclementeexternal link 25 1500
Departments of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education,
Emory University,
Atlanta, GA

Roger I. Glassexternal link 91 1498
National Center for Infectious Diseases,
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,
Atlanta, GA

Patrick J. Brennanexternal link 90 1416
Mycobacterial Research Laboratories,
Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology,
Colorado State University,
Fort Collins, CO

Mary Jane Rotheram-Borusexternal link 65 1394
Center for Community Health,
University of California,
Los Angeles, CA

Stephen L. Hoffmanexternal link 79 1378
Sanaria Inc.,
12115 Parklawn Drive Suite L,
Rockville, MD 20852

David A. Cooperexternal link 50 1366
National Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research,
University of New South Wales,
Sydney, Australia

Jerry R. Mcgheeexternal link 50 1365
University of Alabama at Birmingham,
Birmingham, Alabama

C. H. Lu 50 1316
Department of Neurology,
Chang Gung Memorial Hospital,
123, Ta Pei Road,
Niao Sung Hsiang,
Kaohsiung Hsien, Taiwan

Thomas J. Coatesexternal link 43 1298
Center for AIDS Prevention Studies,
University of California,
San Francisco, CA

Margaret A. Chesneyexternal link 26 1287
University of California San Francisco,
Center for AIDS Prevention Studies,
74 New Montgomery St., Suite 600,
San Francisco, CA 94105

Anthony D. Harriesexternal link 96 1286
National Tuberculosis Control Programme,
Ministry of Health and Population,
Lilongwe, Malawi

Vincent Sorianoexternal link 84 1235
Director, Dept. of Infectious Diseases
Hospital Carlos III,
Madrid, Spain

James A. Inciardiexternal link 21 1230
Center for Drug and Alcohol Studies,
University of Delaware,
Coral Gables, Florida

Tomas Jelinek 55 1200
Institute of Tropical Medicine,
Humboldt University,
Berlin, Germany

Kevin Marshexternal link 119 1172
Kenya Medical Research Institute/
Wellcome Trust Programme,
Centre for Geographic Medicine Research,
Coast, Kilifi District Hospital,
Kilifi, Kenya

Allan Saul 60 1168
Malaria Vaccine Development Unit,
NIAID, National Institutes of Health, Twinbrook I,
5640 Fisher Lane,
Rockville, MD 20853

Anamika Nath 62 1061
Division of Infectious Diseases,
School of Medicine, Scaife Hall,
University of Pittsburgh,
3550 Terrace Street,
Pittsburgh, PA 15261

Marcel Tannerexternal link 135 1056
Swiss Tropical Institute,
PO Box, CH-4002
Basel, Switzerland

Michael W. Rossexternal link 32 1015
Center for Health Promotion and Prevention Research,
School of Public Health,
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston,
Houston, Texas

Gerry V. Stimsonexternal link 16 997
Centre for Research on Drugs and Health Behaviour,
Imperial College London,
London, England

Roy M. Andersonexternal link 18 990
Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology,
Faculty of Medicine,
Imperial College London,
St Mary’s Campus, Norfolk Place,
London W2 1PG, UK

Kenrad E. Nelsonexternal link 18 988
Department of Epidemiology,
Johns Hopkins University
Bloomberg School of Public Health,
Baltimore, MD

Ron Stallexternal link 22 984
Prevention Research Branch,
Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention,
National Center for HIV, STD, TB Prevention,
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,
Atlanta, 30333, GA

Nalin Rastogiexternal link 62 969
Institut Pasteur de Guadeloupe,
Pointe-à-Pitre, Guadeloupe

François Nostenexternal link 84 966
Faculty of Tropical Medicine,
Mahidol University,
Bangkok, Thailand

Dick Menziesexternal link 53 950
Respiratory Division
McGill University Health Centre, and McGill University
Montréal, Quebec, Canada

Samuel R. Friedmanexternal link 48 934
National Development and Research Institutes,
New York, New York

Judith A. Steinexternal link 23 921
Vaccine Research Center,
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases,
National Institutes of Health,
40 Convent Drive,
Bethesda, Maryland 20892-3017

D. A. Enarsonexternal link 60 916
Scientific Activities Unit,
International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease,
Paris, France

Alan F. Cowmanexternal link 83 910
Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research,
Parkville VIC 3050, Australia

Stephen A. Wardexternal link 50 903
Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine,
Liverpool, United Kingdom

Robert Colebundersexternal link 49 902
Institute of Tropical Medicine,
Antwerp, Belgium

William R. Jacobs, Jr.external link 77 901
Howard Hughes Medical Institute,
Albert Einstein College of Medicine,
Bronx, New York 10461

Tom H. M. Ottenhoffexternal link 59 898
Department of Immunohematology and Blood Transfusion,
Leiden University Medical Center,
Leiden, The Netherlands

Sanjeev Krishnaexternal link 70 868
Department of Infectious Diseases,
St. George’s Hospital Medical School,
London SW17, United Kingdom

Michael P. Careyexternal link 23 860
Department of Psychology and Center for Health and Behavior,
Syracuse University,
Syracuse, New York

Anthony A. Holderexternal link 51 860
Division of Parasitology,
National Institute for Medical Research,
Mill Hill, London, UK

G. J. Hubaexternal link 16 849
The Measurement Group,
5811A Uplander Way,
Culver City, CA 90230

Christine Katlamaexternal link 54 838
Department of Virology-EA2387 and Infectious Diseases,
Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital,
Paris, France

Simon L. Croftexternal link 56 820
Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases,
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine,
London, United Kingdom

Shyam Sundar 75 818
Kala-azar Medical Research Centre,
Muzaffarpur, India

Robert B. Teshexternal link 50 787
University of Texas Medical Branch,
Galveston, Texas

Steven R. Meshnickexternal link 50 771
Department of Epidemiology,
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,
Chapel Hill, NC

Hans W. Pfisterexternal link 58 766
Department of Neurology,
Max von Pettenkofer Institute,
Ludwig-Maximilian-University,
Munich, Germany

Eleanor M. Rileyexternal link 50 765
Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases,
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine,
London, United Kingdom

Kevin C. Kainexternal link 70 724
University of Toronto,
Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Roberto Manfrediexternal link 63 720
Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine,
Division of Infectious Diseases,
University of Bologna Alma Mater Studiorum ,
S. Orsola Hospital,
Bologna, Italy

David D. Celentanoexternal link 49 713
Department of Epidemiology,
Johns Hopkins University,
Bloomberg School of Public Health,
Baltimore, MD

Anders Björkmanexternal link 51 708
Malaria Research Laboratory,
Unit of Infectious Diseases,
Department of Medicine,
Karolinska University Hospital,
Karolinska Institute,
Stockholm, Sweden

Philip J. Rosenthalexternal link 91 704
Department of Medicine,
San Francisco General Hospital,
University of California,
San Francisco, CA

Anke A. Ehrhardtexternal link 17 683
HIV Center for Clinical and Behavioral Studies,
New York State Psychiatric Institute and Columbia University,
New York, NY

Ronald O. Valdiserriexternal link 19 683
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,
600 Clifton Road (E07),
Atlanta, GA

David A. Sackexternal link 86 680
Vaccine Testing Unit,
The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health,
Baltimore, MD

François Dabisexternal link 76 677
NSERM U593,
Université Victor Ségalen,
146 rue Léo Saignat,
33076 Bordeaux, France

Peter A Selwynexternal link 22 673
Department of Family and Social Medicine,
Montefiore Medical Center,
Albert Einstein College of Medicine,
Bronx, NY 10467

W. Henry Boomexternal link 49 653
Department of Medicine,
Division of Infectious Diseases,
Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and University Hospitals of Cleveland, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Note that this is the sum of articles indexed in the Social SciSearch and SciSearch databases, not a universal count of all the author’s writings.

2007 Threat #02 Infectious Disease Top Books

Earth Threat #2: Infectious Disease

A Listmania! list by Robert David STEELE Vivas (Oakton, VA United States)
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)
The list author says: “There are ten threats, twelve policies, and eight players other than the EU and USA that matter if we are to get a grip on our future. Each of these 30 topics is addressed at www.earth-intelligence.net, and in Amazon discussion groups being created to bring together authors and readers to form a global information sharing network that will be superior to what secret intelligence and secret government bureaucracies can put together. This is how we save Humanity and our Earth–by taking back the power over relevant information and the policies that have here-to-fore been dominated by special interests instead of ourselves, the taxpayers and end-users.”
Betrayal of Trust: The Collapse of Global Public Health
1.  Betrayal of Trust: The Collapse of Global Public Health by Laurie Garrett
The list author says:
“See my longer review. This book, C. K. Prahalad’s book on “The Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid,” and the work of Paul Hawken and Herman Daly are what got me to launch the Earth Intelligence Network–I realized our government is lunatic in focusing on terrorism in the context of the ten threats, twelve policies, and eight challengers.”
$12.14   Used & New from: $0.01
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (51 customer reviews)
The Complete Idiot's Guide to Dangerous Diseases & Epidemics
2.  The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Dangerous Diseases & Epidemics by David Perlin
The list author says:
“How can you miss with a title like this.”
Used & New from: $0.39
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
See buying options
Control of Communicable Diseases Manual
3.  Control of Communicable Diseases Manual by James Chin
The list author says:
“We try.  However, no airport, train, or bus manager has the authority to detail an entire vehicle worth of passengers for medical screening even under the most disturbing of symptomatic conditions.”
Used & New from: $0.01
4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
See buying options
Justinian's Flea: Plague, Empire, and the Birth of Europe
4.  Justinian’s Flea: Plague, Empire, and the Birth of Europe by William Rosen
The list author says:
“Plagues are not necessarily bad.”
Used & New from: $0.01
3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (71 customer reviews)
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Beating Back the Devil: On the Front Lines with the Disease Detectives of the Epidemic Intelligence Service
5.  Beating Back the Devil: On the Front Lines with the Disease Detectives of the Epidemic Intelligence Service by Maryn McKenna
The list author says:
“This is absolutely fascinating.  Larry Brilliant’s first Google.org investment was in the Global Public Health Intelligence Network.  Early warning requires early observation, one reason why denied areas like China may suffer millions of dead as a penalty (or blessing) for their closed communications.”
Used & New from: $0.43
4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
See buying options
Koneman's Color Atlas and Textbook of Diagnostic Microbiology (Color Atlas & Textbook of Diagnostic Microbiology)
6.  Koneman’s Color Atlas and Textbook of Diagnostic Microbiology (Color Atlas & Textbook of Diagnostic Microbiology) by Elmer W. Koneman
The list author says:
“Very cool.”
$95.75   Used & New from: $60.00
4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
Infectious Diseases in 30 Days
7.  Infectious Diseases in 30 Days by Frederick S. Southwick
The list author says:
“Great title, a probable winner.”
Used & New from: $15.80
3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
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Infectious Diseases Quick Glance (LANGE Quick Glance)
8.  Infectious Diseases Quick Glance (LANGE Quick Glance) by Frederick S. Southwick
The list author says:
“Very expensive but probably worth it.”
Used & New from: $1.60
See buying options
The Hot Zone: A Terrifying True Story
9.  The Hot Zone: A Terrifying True Story by Richard Preston
The list author says:
“Be afraid.”
$10.07   Used & New from: $1.98
4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (612 customer reviews) | 1 customer discussion
Infections and Inequalities: The Modern Plagues, Updated with a New Preface
10.  Infections and Inequalities: The Modern Plagues, Updated with a New Preface by Paul Farmer
The list author says:
“An alternative to Laurie Garrett,”
$24.30   Used & New from: $6.70
4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
The Coming Plague: Newly Emerging Diseases in a World Out of Balance
11.  The Coming Plague: Newly Emerging Diseases in a World Out of Balance by Laurie Garrett
The list author says:
“The best writer in English on this topic.”
$13.43   Used & New from: $0.01
4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (95 customer reviews) | 2 customer discussions
Sherris Medical Microbiology : An Introduction to Infectious Diseases
12.  Sherris Medical Microbiology : An Introduction to Infectious Diseases by C. Ray
The list author says:
“Introductory work.”
Used & New from: $1.49
2.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
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Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases: 2-Volume Set
13.  Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases: 2-Volume Set by Gerald L. Mandell
The list author says:
“The big dog.  If I don’t find a book that covers it, be aware that we have four big problems: 1)  resistant strains from decades of Russian and US over-prescription of antibiotics; 2) completely new diseases like SARS; 3) mutating diseases that combine in an animal host; and 4) the leap of diseases from animals to humans (e.g. West Nile, SARS).”
Used & New from: $80.00
4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
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Emerging Viruses: AIDS and Ebola: Nature, Accident, or Intentional?
14.  Emerging Viruses: AIDS and Ebola: Nature, Accident, or Intentional? by Leonard G. Horowitz
The list author says:
“Worth careful consideration.  Some of the stuff Pfizer and others are doing in Africa is not just criminal, it threatens all of humanity.”
$19.87   Used & New from: $0.24
4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (43 customer reviews)
Red Book Atlas of Pediatric Infectious Diseases
15.  Red Book Atlas of Pediatric Infectious Diseases by American Academy of Pediatrics
The list author says:
“I like the focus on children.”
$89.36   Used & New from: $44.99
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
Six Modern Plagues and How We Are Causing Them
16.  Six Modern Plagues and How We Are Causing Them by Mark Jerome Walters
The list author says:
“For vacation reading (smile).”
$24.44   Used & New from: $4.89
3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
Environmental Health: Third Edition
17.  Environmental Health: Third Edition by D. W. Moeller
The list author says:
“Health is a four-part deal: healthy lifestyle, healthy environment, natural or alternative cures, and both last and least (but most expensive and abusive) medical remediation.”
Used & New from: $0.46
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
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Natural Alternatives to Antibiotics
18.  Natural Alternatives to Antibiotics by Dr. John McKenna
The list author says:
“Very important.”
Used & New from: $0.31
4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
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Essentials of Environmental Health
19.  Essentials of Environmental Health by Robert H. Friis
The list author says:
“Never can have too much of this topic.”
Used & New from: $4.90
3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
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International Travel Health Guide
20.  International Travel Health Guide by Stuart Rose
The list author says:
“The web can be more up-to-date, but for the frequent traveler, this is a value.”
Used & New from: $0.01
See buying options
Timebomb : The Global Epidemic of Multi-Drug Resistant Tuberculosis
21.  Timebomb : The Global Epidemic of Multi-Drug Resistant Tuberculosis by Lee B. Reichman
The list author says:
“Popularized by the moron lawyer that flew across the Atlantic, this is worth noting.  Laurie Garrett’s Betrayal of Trust was the first major book to show how over-prescription of antibiotics in Russia, and Russian prisons, created a really terrible form of resistant tuberculosis.”
Used & New from: $18.20
4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
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Plagues & Poxes: The Impact of Human History on Epidemic Disease
22.  Plagues & Poxes: The Impact of Human History on Epidemic Disease by Alfred J. Bollet
The list author says:
“I like the historical aspect.”
$25.86   Used & New from: $3.36
3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
How I Conquered Cancer Naturally
23.  How I Conquered Cancer Naturally by Eydie Mae
The list author says:
“One of the books banned by the American Medical Association….”
Used & New from: $9.89
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
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New York Times Deadly Invaders: Virus Outbreaks Around the World, from Marburn Fever to Avian Flu
24.  New York Times Deadly Invaders: Virus Outbreaks Around the World, from Marburn Fever to Avian Flu by Denise Grady
The list author says:
“Garrett is the best, but this is useful.”
$13.22   Used & New from: $0.01
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
Infections of Leisure
25.  Infections of Leisure by David Schlossberg
The list author says:
“Brilliant.  Obesity plus.”
Used & New from: $0.01
See buying options
Curing the Incurable: Vitamin C, Infectious Diseases, and Toxins
26.  Curing the Incurable: Vitamin C, Infectious Diseases, and Toxins by Thomas E. Levy
The list author says:
“Definitely worthwhile.”
Used & New from: $6.88
4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
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Revenge of the Microbes: How Bacterial Resistance Is Undermining the Antibiotic Miracle
27.  Revenge of the Microbes: How Bacterial Resistance Is Undermining the Antibiotic Miracle by Abigail A. Salyers
The list author says:
“Thesis, anti-thesis, synthesis.”
$27.45   Used & New from: $7.21
3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
The Alcoholic Republic: An American Tradition
28.  The Alcoholic Republic: An American Tradition by W. J. Rorabaugh
The list author says:
“Worth noting.  Homosexuality is not a disease, it is a genetic condition.  Alcohol kills vastly more people and costs vastly more in damages than marijuana.  So why are we putting all these people in jail for marijuana and allowing restuarants to serve alcohol with no designated driver at the table?”
$19.25   Used & New from: $4.24
4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
Bioterrorism: Guidelines for Medical and Public Health Management
29.  Bioterrorism: Guidelines for Medical and Public Health Management by Donald A. Henderson MD
The list author says:
“As one of the first CIA officers to chase terrorists, ostensibly full-time, in the 1980’s, I have to say, books like this are largely worthless.  The biological and chemical toxins we allow Wal-Mart and Dupont and others to spew into the Earth are vastly more likely to take out millions than anything a terrorist might do.”
$32.95   Used & New from: $0.13
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

2007 Threat #02 Infectious Disease Top Centers

EIN Starting Points/Rank

Centers for Disease Control – Emerging Infectious Diseasesexternal link
U. S. CDC Site – Tracking trends and analyzing new and reemerging infectious disease issues around the world. 1

World Health Organization – Infectious Diseasesexternal link
Provides links to descriptions of activities, reports, news and events, as well as contacts and cooperating partners in the various WHO programmes and offices working on this topic. Also shown are links to related web sites and topics. 2

International Society for Infectious Diseasesexternal link
Goals of ISID are to increase the knowledge base of infectious diseases through research and enhance the professional development of individuals in this discipline; extend and transfer technical expertise in infectious diseases and microbiology; and create and foster partnerships for the control and cost-effective management of infectious diseases around the world. 3

AIDS Education Global Information System (AEGiS)external link
The AEGiS mission is to facilitate access to current patient/clinician information, specific to HIV/AIDS via state-of-the-art technology and to preserve for future generations a global history of the pandemic with our historical news and treatment database. Claims to be the largest free-access virtual AIDS library on earth. 4

Globalhealthfacts.orgexternal link
A project of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, provides free, up-to-date and easy-to-access data by country on HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria and other key health and socio-economic indicators. The data are displayed in tables, charts, and color-coded maps and can be downloaded for custom analyses. 5

Global Fund to Fight Aids, Tuberculosis and Malariaexternal link
Created to finance a dramatic turn-around in the fight against AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria. These diseases kill over 6 million people each year, and the numbers are growing. Operates as a financial instrument, not an implementing authority. Site in several languages. 6

TDR- The Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseasesexternal link
An independent global program of scientific collaboration, co-sponsored by UNICEF, UNDP, World Bank and WHO, it aims to help coordinate, support and influence global efforts to combat a portfolio of major diseases of the poor and disadvantaged. TDR focuses on neglected infectious diseases that disproportionally affect poor and marginalized populations. 7

Hong Kong Society for Infectious Diseasesexternal link
Goals of HKID are to promote the advancement of the study of infectious diseases and to keep the medical profession and the public well informed of the latest developments in the battle against infectious agents. 8

GAVIexternal link
The Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunizations – Mission is to save children’s lives and protect people’s health through the widespread use of vaccines. Site includes info on impact of GAVI, country proposals and country monitoring reports. Reports in several languages. 9

Global Emerging Infections Surveillance & Response Systemexternal link
Established in 1996 as expanded mission of the U.S. DoD, to include support of global surveillance, training, research, and response to emerging infectious disease threats through: centralized coordination; improved preventive health programs and epidemiological capabilities; and enhanced involvement with military treatment facilities and U.S. and overseas laboratories. 10

Center for Complex Infectious Diseasesexternal link
The primary mission of CCID is to determine the nature, origin, disease associations, modes of transmission, methods of diagnosis and responses to therapy of complex infectious diseases, and to disseminate such information. CCID is currently specializing in the detection and characterization of viruses which have undergone a “stealth” adaptation to avoid elimination by the immune system. 11

AIDS Vaccine Advocacy Coalitionexternal link
AVAC is a community and consumer based organization, founded to accelerate the ethical development and global delivery of vaccines against HIV/AIDS. Provides independent analysis, policy advocacy, public education and mobilization to enhance AIDS vaccine research and development. 12

Stop TB Partnershipexternal link
Goal is to eliminae TB as a public health problem and, ultimately, to obtain a world free of TB. Comprises a network of international organizations, countries, donors from the public and private sectors, governmental and nongovernmental organizations and individuals that have expressed an interest in working together to achieve this goal. 13

Prevention of Avian Influenzaexternal link
Hong Kong-based site providing information on Avian Influenza H5N1 aka “Bird Flu”. Includes What’s News, hotline, related links. In English and Chinese. 14

LEPRA.org.ukexternal link
LEPRA is a medical development charity with a mission to restore health, hope and dignity to people affected by leprosy and other diseases of poverty. We currently work in 10 of the world’s most deprived countries covering a population of approximately 300 million. 15

2007 Threat #02 Infectious Disease Forecast

PDF: Infectious Disease

THREAT:  Infectious Disease

Globalization and freedom of air travel allow a communicable human disease to travel from anywhere to anywhere else within 24 hours. Short of blood tests and lengthy quarantine of travelers there is little that can be done to prevent a carrier of a highly communicable, highly lethal disease walking the streets of a large population centre today. The use of disease as a new asymmetric tactic would make explosives seem primitive. Walking the path to martyrdom through densely populated cities infected with a well-chosen disease, a “dead man walking” could bring havoc – and fear. But if the “terrorists” don’t do it, diseases assisted only by ignorance and negligence may get there first. Broadly speaking, diseases have three sources:
Protozoa – the tiniest of animals typically inhabiting water and other animals as parasites; the commonest example is malaria, threatening one-twelfth of the human population, caused by protozoans in the bite of an infected female Anopheles mosquito. Such diseases can be prevented by physical interdiction (DDT, mosquito nets) and medication treating or repairing the effects.

Bacteria – microscopic single celled organisms; life would not exist without bacteria in animal digestion, the nitrogen cycle and other essential processes. But some bacteria turn to the dark side – tuberculosis readily treatable if diagnosed early is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis; Bacillus anthracis can form hardy air-borne spores and cause highly lethal anthrax. Common treatments are killing the bacteria before it infects or the use of the appropriate antibiotic after infection.

Viruses, the ultimate in simplicity and masters of self-preservation, are simply a nucleic acid (DNA or RNA) instruction-set covered by a protein sheath. They reproduce only by penetrating cells and using the cell’s reproductive mechanism to replicate themselves. Variations in copying the code produces mutations of the virus. Examples are highly contagious, high lethality Ebola caused by an airborne virus spores and H5N1 (avian influenza) that is highly communicable among some animals but non-communicable (or weakly communicable) to humans. Such infections are commonly prevented or attenuated by injecting a vaccine, small doses of crippled or dead versions of the target virus, that teaches the body’s immune system what to kill on sight.

That’s the good news. DDT remains the most effective interdiction against malaria but it is banned in most developed nations because of the devastating persistent effect on the environment. Use of the wrong antibiotic, or misuse, or over-use creates – by natural selection – strains of bacteria that are resistant to many or all antibiotics. Mutation of viruses means that the vaccine administered today after three months development may be useless against a mutant version of the virus that appeared in the infected subject yesterday. Simple changes in the protein sheath will render it invisible to an immune system trained by a vaccine to recognise other characteristics. The worst case is when a virus attacks the cells of the immune system itself – as with HIV/AIDS.

These “second generation” dangers of infectious diseases are not just theoretical. A new strain of tuberculosis identified recently in South Africa is quickly fatal in HIV/AIDS patients and a disease once thought beaten may spread around the world anew. A mutation in the H5N1 virus is theoretically possible any day and would make it highly communicable to humans. A range of vaccine-preventable diseases thought to be eliminated in developed countries such as measles, mumps, whooping cough, and poliomyelitis are making a reappearance – complacency has led to a drop-off in vaccination and many doctors have “forgotten” to look for these diseases in patients. Neglect of these vaccination programs poses the hazard of self-inflicted epidemics. The over-use and misuse of antibiotics over decades, particularly in the US, is acknowledged as a major contributor to new more dangerous strains of pathogens such as some Staphylococci that are found only in hospitals.

Apart from these dangers to ourselves, miscreants using asymmetric tactics can bring immense harm to populations by transporting uncommon but highly contagious pathogens to highly populated areas. Whether a pathogen is weaponisable is a buzz-word in this field; that is, can it be produced, packaged, transported and effectively deployed in potent, dispersed form. Anthrax in spore form is well-suited to this but a range of other pathogens can be presented in a matrix of lethality and deployability. There is little confidence that health infrastructures could cope beyond a few days or weeks against even a small but effective pathogen attack in a large population centre — the health services themselves will be the first victim, followed possibly by public order. Mortality will be a mere detail.

Near-Term:

There is every indication that a public health investment would yield worthwhile benefits in doing the easily do-able — education of doctors and the population about vaccination, misuse of antibiotics, and early detection and treatment of diseases such as tuberculosis.  Meanwhile, the security community should continue to inventory the hazards from various pathogens – lethality vs. communicability vs. availability vs. deployability vs. treatments vs. likelihood. A careful study may show that anthrax (and VX) is the least of worries.

Mid-Term:

The abilities of the biological sciences around the world is as good as scientific discovery allows. The weakest link by far is government coordination in the mitigation of avoidable endemic diseases, fore-knowledge of the logically possible types of pathogen attacks by miscreants, and planning for response in the event of such attacks. Planning and exercises around the world prompted by the perceived H5N1 threat are encouraging but exercises and resource planning should accommodate a range of incubation periods and infection rates. Many variations will provide very bleak results.

Long-Term:

Control of airspace, liquids on aircraft, quick temperature measurement of incoming travelers and other measures all mitigate against some forms of biological attack. One scenario worthy of exploring is a highly contagious, highly lethal (or debilitating) disease with a long incubation period and long period of contagion. Concealing a weapon of mass destruction in the cells of the body is simple, cheap, effective, and un-detectable until vast numbers of people have been infected. Generally, the actors in this scenario need to be prepared to die but that might not be an impediment.